Major Power Interstate Conflict in the Post-World War II Era: An Increase, a Decrease, or No Change?

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1982-12
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University of Utah
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The second World War is often regarded as a watershed in world history. Observers have pointed to a number of changes in the global system that occurred after its conclusion: the emergence of bipolar system structure, along with new contenders for international leadership; the invention (and subsequent proliferation)of weapons of extreme power; and the explosion of new nation-states has created a truly global system. But have these changes been accompanied by changes in behavior between nation states? This paper will investigate one aspect of interstate behavior--military conflict involving the major powers--and ascertain whether the time period 1946-1976 was marked by a sharp change in the amount of this conflict, as compared to the period 1816-1945.

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Stoll, Richard J.. "Major Power Interstate Conflict in the Post-World War II Era: An Increase, a Decrease, or No Change?." The Western Political Quarterly, 35, no. 4 (1982) University of Utah: 587-605. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/71122.

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